2015
04.23

Sarah Wittman describes “simultaneously designing top-down and bottom-up until your designs meet in the middle”. She goes into a little detail on the subject, and I recommend reading what she has to say. Like Sarah’s, my project (as it currently exists) has come together in the middle.

When I first started this effort I had an idea to make what I call a “serialized” processor. The idea was to be able to operate on a stream of bits rather than on a collection of bits. The theoretical advantages of this idea were as follows:

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2015
04.23

Having been introduced to this project, you may have some desire to follow along. I am thrilled at the prospect of having others follow along on this adventure. The possibility that others might find this project helpful or learn from it in some way is an equally thrilling prospect. However, this is an adventure, and as such, there are risks. This post is to serve as fair warning for those that would follow.

As stated in the introduction, this project began in 2009, and has largely taken place in my mind. Up to this point I have written far too little down, which means most of the project details are still in my head. Part of the reason for these project logs is to get these details into a less volatile form of storage, and after six years, there are many details.

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2015
04.20

If not history, then certainly popular culture is filled with great butlers. The ever dedicated Cato Fong is butler and sparring partner to the incorrigible Inspector Clouseau. Alfred Pennyworth has taken care of Bruce Wayne since childhood. Wadsworth is a hero two thirds of the time.

In August of 2012 I was introduced to another butler wholly dedicated to his craft. His name is Jenkins. Like the other butlers mentioned, Jenkins is something of a hero in his own right. He is surprisingly capable, incredibly flexible, and immensely helpful. Allow me to introduce you.

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